All posts tagged: Slow Food

Identita, London: The International Chefs Conference

I bounced back from Ireland to the International Chefs Conference, IdentitĂ , at Vinopolis. Traditionally held in Italy, it has been held in London for two years now, and is an inspiring couple of days, with chef demonstrations, talks, tastings, and an excellent selection of Italian produce to sample. More bijoux than most food conferences, there was a clear focus on quality and excellence. When I heard about it, I couldn’t resist going along for both days so cleared my diary, and made my way. There is so much that I could tell you about, I’ll start with some photos and highlights. A brilliant and hilarious demo from quirky Hong Kong chef, Alvin Leung. A self taught 2* chef who cooks at his Hong Kong restaurant Bo Innovation, Alvin cooked his interpretation of the English breakfast with lotus root stuffed with bone marrow, lotus seeds and 1000 year old egg. He kicked it off with a martini and his sous chefs name was Devil. He was funny, fresh, and inspiring. I found myself laughing a lot …

Slow Food Market, London

I spent this past bank holiday weekend in London, and, intentionally had no plans, save unpacking, wandering and being nice to myself. I had read about The Cans Festival in Waterloo, a street art exhibition that sounded really interesting, so I popped down on Sunday evening. To my surprise I also found a Slow Food Market nearby! What a treat. I’ve been a fan of the Slow Food movement for sometime. If you haven’t heard of it, it started in Italy 22 years ago and works to preserve the pleasure gleaned through food through preservation of the heritage, tradition and culture of food. They also work to protect biodiversity and the environment. In their words: Slow Food is good, clean and fair food. We believe that the food we eat should taste good; that it should be produced in a clean way that does not harm the environment, animal welfare or our health; and that food producers should receive fair compensation for their work. We consider ourselves co-producers, not consumers, because by being informed about …